Sights and Stuff

Downloads and helpful bits:

Try what makes sense. Use what works.

(Please send in any of your own). Click on text that becomes underlined when your cursor is placed on it.


If you want an estimate of your sight marks:

If you want an estimate of the weight on your fingers, or what your draw length should roughly be:

You should only calculate your peak bow weight if you can't get a bow scale. You may find that bows have heavier or lighter draw weights than those marked on the limbs. Peak bow weight is used to determine your arrow shaft size. If your calculated peak bow weight is wrong, and you use it to choose arrows, you may end up with the wrong arrow spine and have difficulty in tuning your bow.

If you want help choosing arrows:

These charts tend to come up a little stiff for the average club archer.

Click Here for Easton Guides to Download

So why is spine so important? Watch this arrow in flight.

If you want help setting up your bow:

If you want to know your Classification:

If you want to know what the FOC (Forward of Centre %) of your arrows is:

Length.gif

Balance.gif

(and, if you find a practical use for this information, let me know).

If you want a General Guide:

The Archers Reference Guide. (An excellent compendium of all you need to know)

Velmead Basic Guide


Print this, make a record of all your bow details and put it in your scorebook:

Bow Details.gif


Archery Cricket (Unofficial Round)

An archery game played by two teams, each shooting at their own target.
One team is the 'Batters', the other team is the 'Bowlers'.

1.   Two top shooters to be Team Captains.
2.   Team Captains to select team members.
3.   'Bowlers' team to shoot a distance of 20 metres at an 80cm diameter target face.
      'Batters' team to shoot a distance of 20 metres at an 122cm diameter target face.
4.   Wickets are taken by the 'Bowlers' shooting an arrow into each scoring zone on the target face, starting with the 1 zone, then 2 zone, then 3 zone and so on until an arrow is shot into the 10 zone. Each zone must be shot consecutively. Each archer will shoot their 6 arrows to complete an 'over'. Then the next archer will take their turn.
A 'runner' may be used to collect the arrows at the end of each 'over'.
When an arrow hits the 10 zone, then the 'Batters' must stop shooting immediately.
5.   Runs are scored by the 'Batters' shooting only in the 1 to 6 zone on the target face.
Each archer will shoot their 6 arrows to complete an 'over'. Then the next archer will take their turn. A 'runner' may be used to collect the arrows at the end of each 'over'.
6.   A 'Batter' will be dismissed if their arrow :-
Misses the target face = stumped.
Hits the red zone on the target face = l.b.w. (leg before wicket)
Hits the gold zone on the target face = caught.
7.   One 'Bowler' to watch 'Batters' target and record fall of wickets.
8.   One 'Batter' to watch 'Bowlers' target to ensure correct order of wickets.
9.   The two teams will shoot at the same time.
'Batting' will stop immediately at the fall of the last wicket.
10.   Arrows to be collected at the end of each 'over' or when a 'Batter' is dismissed under Rule No. 6.
11.   Team members are to remain in their allotted order to ensure everyone gets a turn.
12.   At the fall of the last wicket, the 'Batting' team will add their scores to make up the number of 'runs' for the 'innings'. The teams will then swap targets for the 'second innings'.
The 'Batting' and 'Bowling' teams swap over. The 'Batting' team will take their turn as 'Bowlers', and the 'Bowling' team will take their turn at 'Batting'.
The completion of the 'second innings' completes one game of cricket.
The team with the highest score, most 'runs', wins.

Archery Cricket games can be more than two 'innings' long. Four 'innings' is more usual.Speed and accuracy is a factor for both teams. The 'Batting' team is trying to score 'runs' as quickly as possible, while the 'Bowling' team is trying to get wickets just as quickly. 


Other Good Sources:

Joe Tapley's Archery Mechanics

Texas State Archery Documentation